Hiroshi Sugimoto

In the Centro D'arte Contemporanea Punta Della Dogana‎ in Venice (Italy) I came across photographs from Hiroshi Sugimoto (1948). It were black and white pictures from his "Stylized Sculptures" series. Hiroshi Sugimoto's pictures are always extremely balanced, technically perfect and well-composed, they are simply beautiful. However, they do not reveal that easily the conceptual comments that seem to be made with his pictures. Once seeing more of his work it becomes obvious that Hiroshi Sugimoto comments on how we, or better people in general, look at things. His "Seascapes" are timeless, one could easily image someone looking at the sea hundreds or thousands of years ago looking at the represented sea and horizon. His "Portraits" (see below an example), actually taken from Madame Tusseaud's wax sculptures, show photos representing well-known historic characters. Obviously these are just representations of representations, but the viewer's mind thinks differently. His "Theaters" series shows entire (from begin to end) movies in a cinema with public on a still picture. This is of course rather abstract; the theater is completely concrete, but the movie and the public have vanished as a consequence of the extremely long exposures.

Photo: Henry VIII, by Hiroshi Sugimoto 1999.

Photo: Henry VIII, by Hiroshi Sugimoto 1999.